About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 4
MSNBCW 3
CNNW 2
FBC 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
nations u.s. ambassador to the united nations has requested three meetings -- meetings with three senators tomorrow. senator kelly, john mccain, and lindsay gramm. the ambassador wishes to speak with them. i am sure she will -- by snc will be accommodated. i am wondering how much mcconnell feels right about now. >> well, interesting thing for the demonstration at this point, the president is sort of trap now in nominating ambassador rice as secretary of state. waiting for the moment that hillary clinton, waiting for her to give the word, but the president, having stood so strong in her defense, strongly in her defense around what she said that up and gauzy and the video that she said was the cause of the attack that killed those americans that now they are boxed in. he pretty well has to stick with her. this is are going around to say in private what she was in public which, based on the testimony from the general and others is, it was a calculation that it was a decision that was made at the white house that it would be bad business to be out saying that it was a terrorist. lou: what is y
met with the jordanian foreign minister and the secretary general of the united nations today, with the united states secretary of state, hillary clinton. although we are not on the ground in the gaza strip, we have been very active for all parties, including hamas. >> the problem has not been, has at any time, that the palestinian authority, when it comes to gaza, is irrelevant, and mahmoud abbas has really had no say in this at the moment, and that's a problem going forward in the bigger picture of palestinian unity, is it not? is this an opportunity in some ways for hamas and fatah, palestinian authority, to make up, to move forward with some sort of sense of unity? >> well, first of all, president abbas is the elected president of the palestinian people everywhere. he has not only electriced president of palestinians in the west bank. he was elected in 2005 in free democratic elections. stoo hamas is running gaza. let's be real about that. >> what i'm trying to tell you -- nobody can deny that we have political differences with hamas. our top priority right now and it has
. and that -- you notice the united nations does not have, does not give the nations that right, particularly because the lessons from the league of nations. and they, he -- the congress said they would gladly redesign the league. in fact, the european nations all said just ask us, we'll remove that. rerefuseed -- he refused. he simply, and the republicans knew that he was that rigid in his nature, and they just selected that, and they just played it to their success. very definitely. yes. there's a question back there. >> it's entirely possible that barack obama may win the electoral vote and may either lose the popular vote or the popular vote may be very close. what effect is that likely to have on his performance in the second term? >> the implication is the weakness that he has. and it's likely that at best if he wins, he will have a small majority in either the electoral college or the popular vote. so that would add to the congressional, the republican position that they don't have to cooperate with the man who doesn't have a mandate. and the mandate is the thing that would, would be o
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
warranted. and think about, you know, obviously, she has a very important position in the united nations. she made it very cheer that she was not just parroting the talking points, that she had obviously done her own homework, and part of her responsibilities is to receive the daily intelligence briefings that includes the classified information. megyn: right. so she knew more than she was el telling us. i see your point. it's not that she just withheld the information about al-qaeda, she made statements that seemed to say al-qaeda had been decimated. of course, in the written statement she provided today to the public, which i want to tell our viewers we have, and in her meetings with you as well came out and did say the talking points provided by the intelligence community were incorrect in a key mr. mr. prest respect. there was no -- in a key respect. she's admitting now that what she said -- in right. megyn: she's blaming it on the intelligence committee. who told her to go on the sunday talk shows, and who specifically gave her this information? >> well, she was asked -- which i thi
the three benchmarks articulated by the united nations, that is recognizing my country's right to exist, abandoning terrorism and violence, supporting peace, then the door is open to negotiations. but the bad news is i see no evidence of that so far. on the contrary, i think in many ways hamas is stuck in a very extreme position and the evidence for that we saw today. we had the bombing in tel aviv on the bus. and hamas praised that. they welcomed that. they said that was legitimate. and so as long as hamas is doing that sort of thing it is difficult to be optimistic. but if they do change, if they do moderate. if they fundamentally reserve some of their very hard line positions, the door can be opened. >> i mean, do you accept, though, obviously in the last eight or nine days, 30 times as many palestinians have been killed as israelis? so clearly, there is bloodshed on both sides. and israel is not blameless here, either. >> i think the most important issue, though, is what were we doing? i mean, this whole operation was not to take territory or change regimes or something grandiose li
, and we have the united nations. something was happening at city hall. one of my colleagues was asked to go down to city hall and you would be able to file at right away. there were some guys from mit, they made scanning equipment-. ves.ati john put on something that looked like scuba diving gear on his back, and it was a huge backpack and there was a cable running into the camera, and he could only get one shot off of this thing. he transmitted that image back in tuesday and it made the paper, noisy as hell. very grainy, messy image. it was nothing that you would see from film. that is the kind of stuff people were dealing with 25 years ago, and when digital cameras first came out, i was one of the last that wanted one. because the images were very noisy, the cameras were very heavy, they were big and intrusive. michele has a bigger camera that is probably more had the normal, but this is the digital camera that will make a file probably as good as the camera right there. in my opinion, this will make a beautiful file, it would blow up alanis on a poster in times square and it gives
, in fact, early 1793. it's the beginning of the first bank of the united states. we have -- europeans lending to the u.s. really since the nation began. and lending to the country itself, but also, a lot of private lending and a lot of private lending is -- turns out to be not very good at paying it back and so the failure to pay back led to the 1819 panic. same thing in 1837 and again in 1857. our reputation in britain in the early part of the 19th century is terrible. we're -- they call us again and again a nation of defalters, a nation of deadbeats effectively. >> the terms like dead have a negative connotation and not for lending and borrowing, if it weren't for debt we wouldn't be the country we are today, would we? >> that's right. i mean, we could not have expanded west. there's an image of freehold pioneers, you know, broadening in to the west. relying on nothing but the first institution that really spreads america to the west is the store. the store provides the european goods that are necessary, plow points and all these other sorts of things and we borrow and borrow to mak
teaching about the same time. for women of color and the entire united states teaching the, two blacks, one nation, one latina. and that is not so long ago. a few years afterwards i went into the classroom and having mostly men in a classroom, most of whom on election night before the election was decided i had to turn us in a classroom and was filled with that romney's. i woke up to a brand-new world. this is the way law schools looked when i was coming out. when you first started teaching to the woman, when he lived in massachusetts he didn't just say professor, he said blake though you could really profess anything. i really rocketed me back. so i think in addition to the mockery generally and the electorate, in addition to the demeaning of women generally, you sort of have a celebrated when were hired, but it's also a double whammy in a political setting. >> i'm in washington. it's an interesting place. i love d.c., but when you look at the washington that we are talking about, when you actually go into the halls of congress and have a visual, the next time you look at something going o
and fall of circuit city," and to some degree, there's uncomfortable truths when you think about nations and companies, there's rise and fall stories r and hopefully the united states is not on the fall side of this, plu political campaigns are a lousy time to think about the hard truths of what's happening. one of the hard truths about the panel is we're five white guys. [laughter] we try to figure out how we could divvy this. we're four tall guys and doug. [laughter] we're very well aware of this. you would not believe how busy -- we did have a more diverse crowd, but for all of those e-mailing saying we want to bill you in, a conversation, we know. it's there. what i want to get into today and talk a little about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation, and what's that mean? in particular, when you talk about strategy in economics, is there something more funmental about the way the united states is positioned in the world, what its choices are. michael porter here with us, michael, wave so they know who you are. we are not very diverse. [laughter] he's a distinguished pr
pakistan. despite challenges in the bilateral relationship between the united states and pakistan, one area in which our national interests continue to align, continue to align, is defeating the terrorists on pakistan soil that threaten both of us. we remain committed to pursuing defense cooperation based on these shared interests. thirdly, we must prevent the amergens of new safe havens for al qaeda elsewhere in the world that could be used to attack the united states or our interests. the last decade of war has shown that coordinated efforts to share intelligence, to conduct operations with partners are critical to making sure that al qaeda has no place to hide. we will expand these efforts, including through support and partnership with governments in transition in the middle east and north africa. this campaign against al qaeda will largely take place outside declared combat zones using a small footprint approach that includes precision operations, partnered activities with foreign, special forces operations and capacity-building so that partner countries can be more effective in combat
public funding and instead we have the incumbent president of the united states spending that much time out trying to raise money for his campaign instead of worrying about the economy, national affairs and international affairs. you may recall one of the debates romney went after obama saying that after the libyan incident you left washington and you went to nevada. that was for a fund-raiser. that's what they're doing and if you think of that many fund raisers, here's an interesting statistic for you. back in 1984, ronald reagan was incumbent president of the united states. he was running for reelection. his campaign had to raise money for the party even though he was taking the federal grant as everyone has until this year in the general election. ronald reagan attended in that year four fund raisers. >> compared to -- >> 221, so we have a president -- this is not an attack on obama. we have a president who is to some extent, not doing their job because they have to be off fund-raising. the romney people felt the same way. romney was heard to be complaining in his campaign that he co
to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back then, the united states might not be in the same position. to his left, we have the smart guy who would have evolved from a would have come in that we could have seen as national security adviser. his deputy secretary the treasury under bush. he is a senior foreign policy ambassador to adjourn year -- germany and one of the few people who synthesizes the economic and the national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat and was one of the reasons i moved to washington. to michael's right, we have doug holtz-eakin. he ran the congressional budget office and he is a very distinguished economis
solution to the problem. so i think with so many he could have united the people of good will to address this problem and that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until a civil war. >> if we could bring john quincy adams to the day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas. our attempt to dictate to society's the kind of society as they have to have. when he had the opportunity as the secretary of state to intervene, monroe would have done whatever he could in the pro-democracy movement so to speak he pointed out that these people have no history of self-government. religiously or politically they had never been exposed to self-government. their political culture and family culture did not tolerate. he said this is a lost cause we must not involve ourselves and said he would not involve us in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, no political history or religious history of self governance. they don't know what it means.
by itself to, quote, peacefully grant the state of texas to withdraw from the united states of america and create its own new government. as "the washington post" dana milbank put it in a recent column, if obama were serious about being a good steward of the nation's finances, he would let them go. did you hear that? because many of those states are what dana milbank said are confederacy of takers, states that get more federal money than they pay. alabama gets $1.71 from the federal government for every $1 paid in taxes. that's a pretty good deal. louisiana gets $1.45 in federal aid for every $1 they pay in taxes. co-author of the book "bush's brain" and director of the political action committee james braxton peterson associate professor of english at lehigh, and michael steele, former chair of the rnc and a political analyst here at msnbc. gentlemen, this is an extraordinary thing but let's talk about this, professor peterson, recent "daily beast" article you outlined using maps, the line from america in 19 -- 1859 to america today where states are petitioning to secede following oba
... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to change doctors within one of the nation's largest networks, dedicated to helping you live a healthier life. other benefits can include vision and hearing coverage -- and the pharmacy saver program gives you access to prescriptions as low as $2... at thousands of pharmacies across the country, in retail locations like these. ♪ call to enroll today and enjoy these benefits... for a $0 monthly premium. most plans also include part d prescription drug coverage. your healthcare needs are unique. that's why, with over 30 years of medicare experience, we're here to guide you every step of the way. open enrollment ends december 7th. so don't wait. if you're medicare eligible, call now... and talk to unitedhealthcare about our plans, like aarp medicarecomplete. let's get you on the right path. call today. ♪ >>> more top lawmakers have expressed the n
important goals, the united states is moving towards the end of the longest sustained armed conflict in the nation's history, and i would also like to take a moment to express my pride in the men and women in uniform who have fought throughout that period, putting their lives on line to protect this country. were it not for their sacrifices, were in not for their willingness to do that, we would not be able to accomplish what we have. thank god they are there. [applause] one thing i found out when i came from the cia to the defense department, i have a lot of great joy is. i have got great weapons, a great ships, great plains, great technologies, but none of that would be worth anything without the good men and women in uniform that serve this country and did it take their lives to protecting this country. that is the real strength of the united states of america. as we transition into this new era, we will have to look at important priorities that will take on a greater urgency, particularly as we looked at the second term of this administration and look at what are the challenges w
barely even noticed it. i mention that because journalism is frequently affected by national interest. to the degree the perception of what happened in the congo is less important than what happens in the united states, we do not cover it. we are engaged by what happens syria, but i do not know if shed a great deal of light. i know you began by asking what is happening in gaza and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. -- point of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualt
performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> i am proud and honored to introduce two individuals. he is a former staff sergeant of the united states army. he is the first living person to receive the armed forces medal of honor for actions that occurred after the and vietnam war perry dead -- be it now war. the major general was awarded the united states highest military decoration for heroic actions in 1968 during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps over 33 years before returning in 1995. his last assignment was in new orleans, louisiana. his decorations include the medal of honor, silver star medal, a bronze star medal, the purple heart, and able accommodation nettle. i now present to you the staff sergeant and the major general. >> the start of this in 2006. jerry served at hotels and conference centers in new york and northern virginia. while serving as general manager as a resort in leesburg, he founded the national medal of honor society. 15 recipients participated. they went on to raise a total of $15
. the pledge allegiance says one nation under god, indivisible, so that the country is indivisible. that is the hope for the country, as a unit. >> we want to remind our viewers we have a special line for people who have signed a petition to secede from the united states. our next call comes from michael and florida. he welcome to the program. are you there? >> i agree with paul. i think we should cut washington and send them adrift. >> what made you want to sign the petition? do really think that could happen? >> i think it can and i think it would be a good thing. we would not be tied up in all of the bureaucratic nonsense. >> would you see florida as becoming its own country? or maybe grouping with other states? >> the latter. host: we had a war over that. caller: we won. host: which way would that be? mike, you still there? we had a war over that and did not turn out too well for the guys trying to secede. be ok thishink it'll time. professor? guest: it is interesting that the states got to get there, and the mind -- may not be contiguous. it might be florida and texas would fo
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)